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But I was tested and I don't have Celiac Disease....
By Suzanne Koval Weiner, Owner Eden's Market


You don't feel well. You explain to your doctor or healthcare provider you're experiencing one or more of the following: "foggy mind", depression, ADHD-like behavior, abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, headaches, bone or joint pain, and chronic fatigue.  Maybe you've got a rash or skin problem that just won't clear up no matter what you put on it.

It could be your diet and eliminating gluten may be your answer.

Going gluten free is not as hard as it sounds. There are so many more foods you will be able to eat than not. Yes it makes you have to think about what you're putting in your body. It can make eating out, ordering pizza or fast food challenging, but not impossible.

Many doctors are not going to think your diet is the culprit because you haven't changed the way
you have been eating. Because both Celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) affect your
immune system, both can develop at any time at any age.

I meet many who are experiencing one or more health issues that might possibly be resolved with a few dietary changes. "Celiac disease is a serious genetic autoimmune disorder where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. It is estimated to affect 1 in 100 people worldwide. Two and one-half million Americans are undiagnosed and are at risk for long-term health complications."

The key word here is genetic. But what about the rest of us? Non-celiac gluten intolerance is probably much more prevalent than actual Celiac disease, yet studies and doctors are quick to dismiss it as nonsense. "Some people experience symptoms found in celiac disease when they have gluten in their diet, yet do not test positive for celiac disease. When removing gluten from the diet resolves symptoms, the terms non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) are generally used to refer to this condition."

Research has not confirmed gluten is the culprit triggering the immune reaction  - as is the case with celiac disease.  Regardless of what part is affecting you, you still need to eliminate gluten from your diet in order for your body to heal.

If you stick your finger in a light socket do you need a doctor to tell you to not do that it again as it is harmful to your health? So if eliminating items from your diet that cause you to feel ill helps you feel better why do you need a doctor's approval? Trust your gut instinct - pun intended.

The plus side is you'll feel better and possibly eat a cleaner, healthier diet.

Try eliminating all gluten - and I mean ALL - not even a little for at least two weeks. Then go ahead and eat something containing gluten - pizza, a bagel, or whole wheat bread. If you don't get any type of reaction then continue to investigate. If you do get a reaction, then it's time to rethink.

To learn more about Eden' Market, a Gluten Free Emporium, call (412) 343-1802 or log on to https://edens-market.com/. Located in Mt. Lebanon, Eden's Market specializes in natural, organic and gluten-free foods, whole-food supplements, homeopathic, herbals and natural products for health and beauty.

For more information, read more at the following websites:

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